Lasinski Introduces International Women’s Day Resolution

Legislation celebrates global accomplishments, contributions of women
Wednesday, March 8, 2017

LANSING — State Rep. Donna Lasinski (D-Scio Township) introduced House Resolution 33 today to declare March 8, 2017, as International Women’s Day in the state of Michigan. This year marks the 106th anniversary of the international celebration, originally known as International Working Women’s Day. Lasinski’s resolution recognizes the struggles women have faced around the world and commemorates the economic, political and social achievements of women past, present and future.

“Women are a majority of the human population, and worldwide we play critical roles in our families, communities, economies, and governments,” said Lasinski. “As we continue to push for full equality for all women, it is important to pause to appreciate the challenges women face and the contributions we nevertheless make in all spheres of life, and I am proud to introduce this resolution to do that here in Michigan.”

Since 1996, organizers of International Women’s Day, which falls on March 8 every year, have assigned themes to each annual celebration, shining the spotlight on the wide range of contributions that women have made, and continue to make, around the world. This year’s theme, “Be Bold For Change,” is committed to calling on people to help create a better, more gender-inclusive world. International Women’s Day recognizes that both the inclusion and the empowerment of women are inextricably linked to the potential of countries to stimulate economic growth and create sustainable democracies. The resolution acknowledges the obstacles women still face in securing these professional and social opportunities, and honors women around the globe who have worked to guarantee equality of opportunity and basic human rights for everyone.

“While it is important to appreciate the progress we have made, and the women whose strength and resilience paved the way for us today, it’s equally necessary to acknowledge that we still have a long way to go,” said Lasinski. “Today, women are still underrepresented in all aspects of public life, and in many countries, women are denied basic human rights and face discrimination simply for being women. Such treatment is no longer acceptable in the 21st century, and I hope my colleagues will join me in pursuing policies that ensure the safety, welfare and basic human rights of women and girls everywhere.”

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